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Andrei Sinyavsky 1925 - 1997

he wrote stories, short novels and fiercely satirical essays on the state of affairs in the Soviet Union

The portrait of Andrej Synyavsky on the cover of on his books published in Italian

The portrait of Andrej Synyavsky on the cover of on his books published in Italian

Andrei Sinyavsky worked for the Soviet Academy of Science’s Institute of World Literature and was also the leading literary critic for "Novyj Mir". He was renowned for his stimulating and anti-conformist essays on 20th century Russian poetry and literature. In the late Fifties, under the pseudonym Abram Terz, he began writing stories, short novels and fiercely satirical essays on the state of affairs in the Soviet Union, smuggling them out of the country for publication abroad. In 1966 he was discovered and tried in an infamous show trial along with his friend and "literary accomplice" Yuli Daniel. He was sentenced to 7 years’ hard labour in a maximum security camp. In 1973 he was allowed to leave the country and he settled in Paris, where he taught for many years at the Sorbonne. His books include: A Voice from the Chorus, Goodnight!, Ivan the Fool.

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The difficult defense of human dignity

In communist totalitarianism

The Gulag as the organized system of soviet labor camps was a powerful instrument for the extermination of entire groups of citizens by the communist totalitarian regime, in the USSR since half of the Twenties and then by emulation of the other countries of the communist bloc, both in Europe and in the Far East.
Through terror, the regime exerted an iron grip over the population who completely submitted to the regime. 

For those who opposed the regime the question was not about risking their lives to rescue other human beings, but to save their true identity at the cost of their life. Through this, indirectly, other lives were saved and this courageous kind of moral resistance contributed to the collapse of the Soviet empire, which collapsed at the end of 1989.