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What's on in the Mid-east?

analysis and features in the foreign press

Revolutions and reforms, in events which could mark a new 1989. The struggle for democracy and its difficulty to gain ground. Maghreb between Iranian danger and Turkish model. Women's rights. All Gadafi's men and the denounciation of the Lybian Ambassador to the UN. Only bread or also freedom?

In the world press
Opposition in Libya Struggles to Form a United Front, by Anthony Shadid and Kareem Fahim, The New York Times, 8 March 2011
Rebel Lybian suburb in fear of night raids by Gaddafi's police, by Peter Beaumont, 3 March 2011
Women's rights a strongpoint in Tunisia, by Katrin Bennhold, The New York Times, 22 February 2011
Next question for Tunisia: the role of Islam in politics, by Thomas Fuller, The New York Times, 20 February 2011
The Lybian population ready to risk lives for its goals, interview to Paris chief of Human Rights Watch, Le Monde, 21 February 2011
The dictator and his hostages, by Joseph Croitoru, Frankfurter Allgemeine, 27 February 2011
Lybia's UN ambassador denounces Khadafi, by John Swaine, The Telegraph, 25 February 2011

1 March 2011

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Crimes of genocide and against the humankind

the denial of the individual's value

The first legal definition in the domain of mass persecution dates back to 1915 and concerns the massacres of the Armenian populations perpetrated by the Turks, which were followed by the trials of the perpetrators before the Martial Court. In the Treaty of Sèvres in 1920 the Great Powers use the terms "crimes against civilization" and "crimes of lèse-humanity". In the aftermath of Second World War, face the Holocaust tragedy, the Military Tribunal of the Nurnberger Trials against Nazi officials started the proceeding by stating the crimes on which it was competent... On 9 December 1948 the General Assembly of the United Nations unanimously approved the Convention for the prevention and punishment of the crime of genocide, which is considered as the most heinous crime against Humanity. 

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A song on the end of the world

animation based on poem by Czeslaw Milosz

Featured story

Hawa Aden Mohamed

teacher and girls’ rights activist