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Protest of the Indian women

oppressed by a wave of rapes

Indian women with veil (Picture by Gabriele Nissim)

Indian women with veil (Picture by Gabriele Nissim)

In the Indian Subcontinent a woman is raped every 22 minutes. The most recent case, the one of a 23 years old girl who was raped by a bus driver with four complicits who also nearly killed her and left her naked and dying on the roadside, sparked fierce outrage. 


Indian women call loudly for safety. In a country where being a woman is a problem starting from prebirth tests, the lack of security is perceived as a serious breach of responsibility from the political leaders. 


Human Rights Watch took charge of the problem and sent an open letter to the indian prime minister, calling for justice for the 23 years old girl and a commitment to ensure that women can go out without being afraid of being raped. 


21 December 2012

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